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de Rokesle
John de Rokesle
(-Bef 1295)
Richard de Rokesle
(Bef 1278-Bef 1321)

 

Family Links

Spouses/Children:
1. Joan de Criel

Richard de Rokesle

  • Born: Bef 16 Nov 1278 1
  • Marriage (1): Joan de Criel
  • Died: Bef 6 May 1321 2

  Noted events in his life were:

• Manorial Estate, 1291, Horsemonden Manor, Tonbridge, Kent, TN12, GB. 3 In the 8th year of king Edward II. this manor was part of the possessions of the family of Rokesle, the heirs of Roger de Rokesle then holding it of the honor of Clare; one of these was Sir Richard de Rokesle, who died without male issue, leaving by his wife Joane, sister and heir of John de Criol, son of Bertram above-mentioned, two daughters his coheirs; of whom Agnes, the eldest, married Thomas de Poynings; and Joane, the youngest, first Hugh de Pateshull, and secondly Sir William le Baud, each of whom in her right became possessed of this manor, and the latter of them died possessed of it in the 4th year of king Edward III. His widow, in the 20th year of that reign, paid aid for it, being then held of the earl of Gloucester.

After which, although their son, Sir William Baud, seems to have had some interest in this estate, at his death in the 50th year of that reign, yet on hers, the manor itself came to her nephew Michael, son of Thomas de Poynings above mentioned, by Joane de Rokesle her sister, in whose descendants it continued down to his grandson Robert de Poynings, who died in the 25th year of king Henry VI. leaving Alianore, the wife of Sir Henry Percy, lord Percy, eldest son of Henry, earl of Northumberland, daughter of Richard de Poynings, his eldest son, who died in his life-time, his next heir; upon which the lord Percy, in her right, became entitled to this manor.

• Manorial Estate, 1291, Mottenden Manor, Hedcorne [Headcorn], Ashford, Kent, TN27, GB. 4 MOTTENDEN, or more truly Modinden, is a manor situated in the northern part of this parish, which with the estate belonging to it, called Great and Little Mottenden, antiently belonged to the family of Rokesle; one of whom, Sir Richard de Rokesle, in the year 1224, anno 9 Henry III. founded a priory on this manor, for friars of the order of the holy trinity, commonly called Trinitarians, being the first house of this order in England. Their rule was that of St. Austin, with some peculiar constitutions. Their habit, a white gown, with a red and blue cross on their breasts; their revenues were divided, one part for their support and maintenance, another to relieve the poor, and a third to redeem such Christians as should be taken captives by the insidels. To this priory the founder at the same time gave this manor; and there were from time to time several pardons and indulgencies granted by the succeeding popes to the benefactors of it, which increased both the reputation and revenues of it.

[...] This manor, with the scite of the priory and lands belonging to it, did not after this long remain in the hands of the crown; for the king granted them in his 30th year to Thomas, lord Cromwell, who was the next year created earl of Essex.

[Have assumed that this manor was handed down as per the other Rokesley manors.]

• Manorial Estate, 1291, North Cray Manor, Sidcup, Bexley, London, DA14, GB. 5 In the reign of king Richard I. North Cray was become part of the possessions of a family, who were seated in the adjoining parish of Rokesle, now called Ruxley, and assumed their surname from it. Malgerius de Rokesle was seated there at the time of the survey of Domesday. His descendant, Sir John de Rokesle, accompanied king Richard I. into Paleftine, and was present with that prince at the siege of Acon there, with many others of the Kentish gentry. He died possessed of these estates, and from him they afterwards descended to his grandson, Gregory de Rokesle, a person of no small account in his time, having been lord mayor of London several times. He was also, as appears by the chartularies of London, keeper of the king's exchange there, and assay master general of the king's mint, and was a good benefactor to the Grey Friars. He died in the 20th of that reign, and was buried in the choir of the church of the friars above mentioned, now called Christ church, but his monument has been long defaced. His son, Sir Richard de Rokesle, was a person of no less reputation, being seneschal and governor of Poictou and Montreal, in Picardy, in the 1st year of king Edward II.'s reign. He is said to have borne for his arms a coat similar to the lord Leybornes, viz. A fess gules, between six lions rampant; yet this coat was not borne by all the different branches of it; for John de Rokesle, grandson of Gregory before mentioned, who was lord of the manor of Lullingstone, in this county, bore, A cross, and in the dexter quarter a rook, as appears by his grave-stone in that church. Sir Richard, above mentioned, married Joan, sister and heir of John de Criol; he left by her two daughters, his coheirs, of whom Agnes, the eldest, married Thomas de Poynings; and Joan, the youngest, became the wife of Hugh de Pateshul; notwithstanding which, upon his death, the manor of North Cray descended to a younger branch of the family of Rokesle, and in the 20th year of king Edward III. It was held by Roger de Rokesle, jun. and his coparcenors, who then paid aid for it, as half a knight's fee in Crey. This Roger de Rokesfe it seems died without issue, and this manor devolved to Poynings, as next of kin, whose descendant, Robert de Poynings, son of Richard de Poynings, by Isabel, daughter and heir of Robert lord Fitz pain, died anno 25 Henry VI. being then possessed of the manors of Rokesle and North Cray, leaving Alianore, the wife of Sir Henry Percy, his cousin, and heir, who had, in her right, possession granted of the manors and lands of her inheritance, among which was the manor and advowson of North Cray; but the manor and advowson of Rokesle went to Robert, younger and only surviving son of the above mentioned Robert de Poynings, as will be hereafter shewn.

• Manorial Estate, 1291, Rokesle [Ruxley] Manor, Sidcup, Bexley, London, DA14, GB. 5 ROKESLE, otherwise RUXLEY, as has been already mentioned, was a distinct parish, from North Cray, till it was united to it by cardinal Poole, archbishop of Canterbury, in 1557

This place, as well as North Cray, was given by William the Conqueror to Odo, bishop of Baieux, his half brother; and it is accordingly thus entered in the survey of Domesday, taken in that prince's reign under. the general title of the bishop of Baieux's lands.

In Helmestrei hundred, Malgerius holds Rochelei of the bishop (of Baieux). It was taxed at 1 suling. The arable land is . . . . . . In demesne there is 1 caracute and an half, and 10 villeins, with 10 borderers, having 2 caracutes and an half. There is 1 mill of 12 shillings. Wood for the pannage of 3 hogs. In the time of king Edward the Confessor it was worth 4 pounds, when he received it 3 pounds, and now 100 shillings. Alured held it of king Edward.

This Malgerius, from his possession and residence at this place, assumed the surname of Rokesle, being called Malgerius de Rokesle, and notwithstanding the disgrace and forseiture of the bishop of Baieux, continued in the possession of Rokesle, though the fee of it was granted to Hugh de Crevequer, who held it in capite, by barony of the king, as of his castle of Dover, it making part of the barony of Crevequer. Of him it was held by Malgerius de Rokesle, by the tenure of performing watch and ward within the castle for a certain time, according to his proportion of land. His descendant, Sir John de Rokesle, who attended king Richard I. into the Holy Land, died possessed of this place; and from him it descended to Richard de Rokesle, who held it in the 7th year of king Edward I.

In the 21st year of that reign, John de Rokesle, was owner of Rokesle, and then endeavoured to get his lands here exempted from suit and service, at the hundred court, but the jury gave it against him. He died possessed of it in the 29th year of Edward I.

In the next reign of king Edward II. this place was held by Sir Richard de Rokesle, seneschal and governor of Poictou and Montreal in Picardy, who died without male issue, leaving by his wife Joan, sister and heir of John de Criol, two daughtets his coheirs, of whom Agnes, the eldest, married Thomas de Poynings; and Joan, the youngest, married first Hugh de Pateshull, and secondly Sir William le Baud, who in her right became possessed of this manor, and died owner of it in the 4th year of king Edward III. In remembrances of which marriages the arms of Baud, Three cbevrons, in chief a label of three points, impaling Rokesle, and of Rokesle impaling Criol, were carved on the roof of the cloisters at Canterbury; and in St. Peter's church, in Canterbury, were the coats of Rokesle and of Poynings, single; and of Poynings impaling severally Rokesle, Talbot, Norwood, and Fitzpain; and of Baud impaling Rokesle. The arms of Rokesle were likewise in the windows of Sheldwich church.

Their son, Sir William Baud, died in the 50th year of king Edward III. possessed of it, with the advowson of the church of Rokesle, holden of the king of his castle of Leeds, as of the barony of Crevequer, by homage and fealty, and by the service of paying to the ward of Dover castle, Richard de Poynings being his kinsman and next heir, who was the younger brother of Thomas, grandson of Thomas de Poynings, who married Agnes, the eldest daughter and coheir of Sir Richard de Rokesle, and sister of Joane, mother of the said William le Baud last mentioned. He died possessed of this estate in the 11th of king Richard II. holding it by the tenure before mentioned. On his death Isabel, his widow, daughter and heir of Robert lord Fitzpain, held it in dower, till her death, in the 17th year of that regin; upon which Robert de Poynings, their son, succeeded to them, and died possessed of them in the 25th of king Henry VI. His eldest son, Richard, whose daughter, Alianore, married Sir Henry Percy, died in his life time, so that Robert de Poynings, the younger and only surviving son of Robert, became intitled to it, and died possessed of it in the 9th year of king Edward IV. he was succeeded by his son, Sir Edward Poynings, a man much in favour, both with king Henry VII. and VIII. being governor of Dover castle, lord warden of the five ports, and K. G. who died possessed of them in the 14th year of the latter reign, having married Elizabeth, daughter of Sir John Scott, by whom he lest no issue, though he had several natural children.

• Manorial Estate, 1291, Tottington Manor, Aylesford, Kent, ME20, GB. 6 TOTTINGTON, or TOTTENDEN, as it is called in the rolls of Aylesford manor, lies about half a mile north-eastward from the priory of Aylesford. In the reign of William the Conqueror it was part of the possessions of Odo, the great bishop of Baieux, and half brother to the king; and accordingly it is thus entered under the general title of that prelate's lands, in the survey of Domesday, taken about 1080.

Robert Latin holds to ferm of the king Tontintune, of the new gift of the bishop of Baieux. It was taxed at half a suling. The arable land is one carucate and a half. In demesne there is one, and three villeins, with nine borderers, having half a carucate. There are four servants and five acres of meadow. Wood for the pannage of two hogs. In the time of king Edward the Confessor it was worth 30 shillings, when he received it 20 shillings, now 40 shillings. Ulnod held it of king Edward.

The same Robert holds in Totintune to ferm of the king one yoke, and that is of the new gift of the bishop of Baieux, and there is nothing except two acres of meadow. It is and was worth separately 10 shillings. Godnin held it of king Edward.

Soon after this the manor of Tottington was become the property of Malgerius de Rokesle, so called from his possessions at Rokesle, in this county, and his son Richard gave the whole tithe of his land, in Totintune to the monks of St. Andrew's, in Rochester, on condition, that he and his wife and son should receive the benefit of the prayers of that society; in whose descendants this manor continued the same as that of Rokesle before described, till at length it came into the possession of Robert de Poynings, who died in the 25th year of king Henry VI. anno 1446, possessed likewise of the advowson of the free chapel of St. Stephen in it, founded by his father, Richard de Poynings, both being held of the king, as of his castle of Leeds, which was of the barony of Crevequer, by knight service. He gave it to Tho. Palmer, esq. of the Court lodge, in Snodland, who had married his only daughter, and was grandson of Thomas, of Snodland, who married the daughter of Fitz Simon.

• Manorial Estate, After 1305, Berewick [Berwick] Manor, Lympne, Hythe, Kent, CT21, GB. 7 BEREWICK, now called Berwick, is a manor here, which lies about half a mile northward of Limne church, in the valley between it and Newin-green. It was given before the Norman conquest, by king Knute, to Eadsy, a priest, who in the year 1032 gave it to the monastery of Christ-church, in Canterbury. The copy of the grant of it may be seen in Somner's Roman Ports, a curious specimen of the manner of the donations of that time; among other revenues of the priory it was allotted to the archbishop, of whom it was afterwards held by knight's service, and continued so till after the Norman conquest. Accordingly it is entered in the record of Domesday, under that general title, as follows:

In Estraites hundred, Wills de Eddesham holds of the archbishop, Berewic as one manor. It was taxed at half a suling. The arable land is three carucates. In demesne there are two, and nine villeins, with nine borderers having one carucate and an half. There are eighteen acres of meadow, and wood for the pannage of twenty bogs. In the time of king Edward the Confessor it was worth sixty shillings, and afterwards twenty shillings, now seven pounds, and yet it yields eleven pounds.

After which this manor appears to have come into the possession of the family of Auberville, in which it remained till Joane, daughter and heir of William de Auberville, marrying Nicholas de Criol, entitled him to it as part of her inheritance. At length his descendant Bertram de Criol dying s. p. Joane his sister carried it in marriage to Sir Richard de Rokesle, whose daughter and coheir Joane, about the middle of king Edward II.'s reign, marrying Thomas de Poynings, he became in her right possessed of it, and in his descendants it continued down to Sir Edward Poynings, of Westenhanger, on whose death in the 14th year of king Henry VIII. without legitimate issue, and even without any collateral kindred, who could make claim to his estates, this manor, among the rest of them, escheated to the crown.

• Manorial Estate, After 1305, Capell Manor, Tonbridge, Kent, TN12, GB. 8 THE MANOR OF CAPELL, called likewise the manor of St. Mary le Merge, was antiently part of the possessions of Nigell de Muneville, whose descendant William de Muneville leaving an only daughter and heir, she carried it in marriage to William de Albrincis, or Averenches, whose son, of the sams name, leaving likewise an only daughter and heir Matilda, she entitled her husband Hamo de Crevequer to it. He left four daughters, of whom Elene, married to Bertram de Crioll, on the partition of their inheritance, entitled her husband to this manor, and he died possessed of it in the 23d year of Edward I. leaving two sons John and Bertram, who both died s.p. and a daughter Joane, who upon the death of the latter became his heir, and carried this manor, among the rest of her inheritance, in marriage to Sir Richard de Rokesle, whose eldest daughter and coheir Agnes entitled her husband Thomas de Poynings to the possession of it; in whose descendants it continued down to Sir Edward Poynings, of Westenhanger, governor of Dover castle and lord warden, who in the 12th year of king Henry the VIII.th's reign gave it in marriage with Mary, one of his natural daughters, to Thomas Fynes, lord Clinton and Saye, to whom this manor was confirmed in the 30th year of it.

• Manorial Estate, After 1305, Criols Court, Shadoxhurst, Ashford, Kent, TN26, GB. 9 CRIOLS-COURT, now usually called Crayals, is an estate in this parish, which was once the patrimony of the eminent family of Criol, and was one of the several seates of theirs in this county, which took their name from them. Bertram de Criol died possessed of it in the 23d year of king Edward I. and his son John dying in the 34th year of that reign s. p. left Joane his sister his next heir, then married to Sir Richard de Rokesle. His eldest daughter and coheir Agnes, married Thomas de Poynings, and by it entitled that family to this among the great inheritance which devolved to her in right of her mother; and in their descendants this estate continued down to Sir Edward Poynings, a man much in favour with king Henry VII. and VIII. under both of whom he enjoyed many important offices of trust and honor.

• Manorial Estate, After 1305, Criols Manor, Borden, Sittingbourne, Kent, ME10, GB. 10 CRIOLS, alias KYRIELLS, with an appendage to it, called Poyles, the very name of which has been long since forgotten, is a manor here, which in early times was in the possession of the eminent family of Criol, who fixed their name on it, as they did on other estates belonging to them in different parts of this county.

Bertram de Criol died possessed of it in the 23d year of king Edward I. anno 1294, whose son John de Criol dying in the 34th year of that reign, s. p. Joane his sister, married to Sir Richard de Rokesle, became his heir, and entitled her husband to this manor.

He left by her two daughters his coheirs, of whom Agnes, the eldest, married Thomas de Poynings, who in her right became possessed of it, and in his name and descendants it continued down to Sir Edward Poynings, governor of Dover-castle, and lord warden, and he died possessed of it in the 14th year of king Henry VIII. anno 1522, not only without legitimate issue, though he had several natural children, but without any collateral kindred, who could lay claim to his estates, so that this manor, among others, escheated to the crown.

• Manorial Estate, After 1305, Eshmerfield Manor, Waltham, Canterbury, Kent, CT4, GB. 11 ASHENFIELD, as it is now usually called, but more properly Eshmerfield, is another manor, lying at the southern boundary of this parish, in Wye hundred, which was formerly part of the possessions of St. Augustine; accordingly it is thus entered, under the general title of their lands, in the survey of Domesday:

In Wy hundred, the abbot himself holds Esmerefel, and Anschitil of him. It was taxed at one suling. The arable land is one carucate, and there is in demesne. . . . with five borderers and six acres of meadow. Wood for the pannage of ten hogs. In the time of king Edward the Confessor it was worth forty shillings, and afterwards twenty shillings, now forty shillings.

Anschitil above-mentioned, appears to have held this manor of the abbot in fee, by a certain rent in lieu of all service, &c. as did after him Ralph Fitzbernard, of whom it was again held by Bertram de Criol, who gave it to his younger son John, and he died possessed of it in the 48th year of Henry III. during whose time Richard de Clare, earl of Gloucester, lord of Tunbridge, and founder of the priory there, vir nobilis & omni laude dignus, died, as it was thought, of poison, in 1262, on a visit to him at this manor-house. His son Bertram left two sons, John and Bertram, and a daughter Joane, who afterwards married Sir Richard de Rokesle, and on both her brothers deaths, s. p. became their heir, and this manor afterwards descended to her two daugh ters and coheirs, Agnes, wife of Thomas de Poynings, and Joane, wife of Sir William le Baud; and upon the division of their inheritance, Joane had this manor allotted to her.

• Manorial Estate, After 1305, Criols Manor, Brenchley, Tonbridge, Kent, TN12, GB. 12 CRIOLS is another manor here, lying about a mile and a half south west from Brenchley village, which in the reign of king Henry III. was in the possession of the eminent family of Criol, in which reign Bertram de. Criol held it, as half a knight's fee, of Alicia de Waltham, as she again did of the earl of Gloucester. He resided, at Ostenhanger, in this county, which seat he rebuilt, and being much in the king's favor, among other offices of trust, was made sheriff of Kent in the 16th and 26th years of that reign, and had the custody of the castles of Dover and Rochester committed to him. His great grandson, John de Criol, died in the 34th year of king Edward the 1st.'s reign, leaving Joane his sister his next heir, married to Sir Richard de Rokesle, who in her right inherited this manor. His eldest daughter and coheir Agnes, married Thomas de Poynings, and intitled him to this manor, in whose name and descendants it continued down to Sir Edward Poynings, a man much in favor with king Henry VII. and VIII. being governor of Dover-castle, lordwarden of the cinque ports, and knight of the garter, and he died possessed of it in the 14th year of the latter reign, anno 1522, not only without legitimate issue, but without any collateral kindred, who could make claim to his estates.

• Manorial Estate, After 1305, Paddlesworth Manor, Folkestone, Kent, CT18, GB. 13 The manor or Padlesworth was antiently part of the estate of the great family of Criol, one of whom, Bertram de Criol, died possessed of it in the 23d year of king Edward I. whose two sons dying without issue, Joane their sister became possessed of this manor, with the rest of her brother's inheritance, which she carried in marriage to Sir Richard de Rokesle, who left his two daughters his coheirs, of whom Agnes, the eldest, married Thomas de Poynings, and entitled her husband to the possession of this manor. He died anno 13 Edward III. and in his descendants it continued down to Robert de Poynings, who lived in king Edward IV.'s reign, and was, as his several ancestors were, summoned to parliament among the barons of this realm, and he passed it away by sale to Sir Thomas Fogge, of Repton...

• Manorial Estate, After 1305, Ostenhanger Manor, Stanford, Ashford, Kent, TN25, GB. 14 WESTENHANGER is an eminent manor here, which was once a parish of itself, though now united to Stanford: Its antient and more proper name, as appears by the register of the monastery of St. Angustine, was Le Hangre, yet I find it called likewise in records as high as the reign of Richard I. by the names both of Ostenhanger and Westenhanger, which certainly arose from its having been divided, and in the hands of separate owners, being possessed by the two eminent families of Criol and Auberville. Bertram de Criol, who was constable of Dover castle, lord warden of the five ports, and sheriff of Kent, for several years in the reign of king Henry III. who from his great possessions in this country, was usually stiled the great lord of Kent, is written in the pipe-rolls of the 27th year of that reign, of Ostenhanger, where it is said he rebuilt great part of the then antient mansion. He left two sons, Nicholas and John, the former of whom marrying with Joane, daughter and heir of Sir William de Aubervilse, inherited in her right the other part of this manor, called Westenhanger, as will be further mentioned hereafter. John, the younger son, seems to have inherited his father's share of this manor, called Ostenhanger, of which he died possessed in the 48th year of king Henry III. as did his son Bertram de Criol in the 23d year of Edward I. leaving two sons, John and Bertram, who both died s.p. and a daughter Joane, who upon the death of the latter became his heir, and carried Ostenhanger, among the rest of her inheritance, in marriage to Sir Richard de Rokesle, seneschal and governor of Poictu and Montreul in Picardy, a man of eminent character in that time, having been created a knight-banneret by king Edward I. at the siege of Carlaverock, in Scotland. He died without issue male, leaving his two daughters his coheirs, of whom Agnes, the eldest, married Thomas de Poynings; and Joane, the youngest, first Hugh de Pateshall, and secondly Sir William le Baud, and upon the division of their inheritance, Ostenhanger was wholly allotted to Thomas de Poynings, who died anno 13 Edward III. bearing for his arms, Barry of six, or, and vert, over all a bend, gules. He left three sons, Nicholas, Michael, and Lucas de Poynings, all three summoned at different times to parliament, among the barons of this realm. The descendants of the latter being summoned as barons Poynings de St. John, which barony became vested in the late duke of Bolton. Upon the division of their inheritance, this manor was allotted to the second son Michael, who died anno 43 king Edward III. and left two sons, Thomas and Richard. Thomas de Poynings, the eldest son, possessed it on his father's death, but he died anno 49 Edward III. s.p. having bequeathed his body to be buried in the midst of the choir of St. Radigund's, of his own patronage, before the high altar, appointing that a fair tomb should be placed over his grave, with the image of a knight made thereon. Upon his death, Richard de Poynings, his youngest brother, succeeded to it, and died possessed of it in the IIth year of king Richard II. as did his son Robert anno 25 Henry VI. having had two sons, Richard de Poynings, who died in his life-time, leaving a sole daughter and heir Alianore, who married Sir Henry Percy, afterwards earl of Northumberland...

• Manorial Estate, After 1305, Westwood Manor, Preston-next-Faversham, Kent, ME13, GB. 15 WESTWOOD is an eminent manor in the south-east part of this parish, which was antiently part of the possessions of the family of Rokesle, by whom it was held of the barony of Crevequer, by the tenure of performing ward to Dover castle. In the reign of Edward II. Sir Richard de Rokesle became by inheritance the owner of it, holding it by knight's services of the before mentioned barony. He died without male issue, leaving by Joane, sister and heir of John de Criol, two daughters his coheirs, of whom Agnes, the eldest, married to Thomas de Poynings, seems to have entitled her husband to it, who in the 2d year of Edward III. obtained a charter of free warren for all his demesne lands in this manor of Westwood among others.

In his descendants it continued down to Robert de Poynings, who died in the 25th year of king Henry VI. He had two sons, of whom Richard, the eldest, died in his life-time, leaving a daughter Eleanor, married to Sir Henry Percy, afterwards earl of Northumberland, and Robert de Poynings, the younger son, became entitled to this manor, and was succeeded in it by his son and heir Sir Edward Poynings, who was much in favor with king Henry VII. and VIII. being lord warden of the five ports, and knight of the garter. He died in the 14th year of the latter reign, 1522, not only without legitimate issue, but without any collateral kindred, who could make claim to his estates, so that this manor, among his other estates, escheated to the crown, and was afterwards granted to Thomas Cromwell, earl of Essex.

• Manorial Estate, After 1305, Seaton Manor, Boughton Aluph, Ashford, Kent, TN25, GB. 16 SEATON is a small manor in this parish, which was held by knight's service in grand sergeantry, to provide one man, called a vautrer, to lead three greyhounds when the king should go into Gascony, until he had worn out a pair of shoes of the price of four-pence, bought at the king's cost; by which service John de Criol, younger son of Bertram, held it at his death in the 48th year of king Henry III. whose grand-daughter Joane becoming heir to her brother's inheritance, who died s. p. she carried this manor in marriage to Sir Richard de Rokesle, who was found to hold it by the like service, in the 11th year of king Edward II. His eldest daughter and coheir Agnes married Thomas de Poynings, and entitled him to the possession of it. In whose descendants it continued till Alianore, daughter of Richard de Poynings, marrying Henry, lord Percy, eldest son of Henry, earl of Northamberland, he, in her right, became entitled to this manor among her other great inheritance in this county and elsewhere.

• Manorial Estate, After 1305, West Shelve Manor, Lenham, Ashford, Kent, GB. 17 THE MANOR OF WEST, alias NEW SHELVE, so called from its situation in regard to the others, and to distinguish it from the adjoining manor of Old Shelve, became part of the possessions of the family of Criol, one of whom Bertram de Criol held it in the reign of Henry III. in whose descendants it continued down to John de Criol, who dying s. p. in the reign of king Edward I. Joane his sister became his heir, and carried this manor among the rest of her inheritance, in marriage to Sir Richard de Rokesle, seneschal and governor of Poitou and Montreul, in Picardy, who left two daughters his coheirs, of whom Agnes the eldest married Thomas de Poynings; and Joane the youngest, first, Hugh de Pateshull, and secondly, Sir William le Baud, nevertheless, they did not inherit this manor, which descended to a younger branch of the family of Rokesle, and it afterwards, on failure of issue, devolved as next of kin, in like manner as Ruxley heretofore described, by reason of the above marriage to the family of Poynings, in which it continued till Sir Ed Poynings, dying in the 14th year of Henry VIIIth's reign, without legitimate issue, and even without any collateral kindred who could make claim to his estates, this manor among the rest of his possessions escheated to the crown.

• Inquisition: Post mortem, 6 May 1321. 2 Writ, 6 May, 14 Edward II.

KENT. Inq. Saturday after St. Dunstan, 14 Edward II. (defaced.)

Terlyngham. The manor, acquired by the said Richard with Joan his wife, by the licence of King Edward I, of Eleanor de Cryel, to hold to them and their heirs, and held of the king in chief by service of 1/8 knight's fee; and a messuage and a carucate of land similarly acquired of Anthony de Bek, to hold to them and the heirs of the said Richard, and held of the archbishop of Canterbury by 1/4 knight's fee and suit at his court of Canterbury.

[Totyn]ton. The manor (extent given), similarly acquired in November, 23 Edward I, of John de Rokesle, and held of Lady Isabella queen of England as of the barony of Crevequer by service of 1/4 knight's fee.

Ecclosse. A carucate of land, similarly acquired of John de Rokeslee, and held of Robert de Insula by service of 1/2 knight's fee; and 30a. land similarly acquired of the said John, and held in gavelkind of Richard le Grey by service of 10s. yearly at his manor of Eylesford.

Of all which the said Joan is now seised by virtue of the said enfeoffments.

Westwode in Preston. The manor (extent given), whereof the messuage and 160a. land, 16a. wood, 14l. rent, and a windmill are held of Queen Isabella as of the barony of Crevequer by service of 1/2 and 1/4 knight's fee, 60a. land are held of the abbot of Faresham in gavelkind by service of 40s. yearly, 30a. land are held of the prior of Christ Church, Canterbury, in gavelkind by service of 10s. yearly, and 10a. land are held of the abbot of St. Augustine's, Canterbury, in gavelkind by service of 2s.

Rokeslee. The manor (extent given), held of the said queen, as of the barony aforesaid, by service of a knight's fee; 100a. land held of the abbot of Lesnes in gavelkind by service of 8s. 4d. yearly; 30a. arable held of the prior of the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem in England by service of 15d. yearly; and 5a. meadow held of John le Fuller in gavelkind by service of 16d. yearly.

His daughters, Joan aged 25, the wife of Walter de Pateshulle, knight, and Agnes, aged 22 and more, the wife of Thomas de Ponynges, are his next heirs.

C. Edw. II. File 66. (23.)


Richard married Joan de Criel, daughter of Bertrand de Criel and Eleanor de Crèvecœur. (Joan de Criel was born before 28 Apr 1278 1 and died before 3 Nov 1322 18.)


Sources


1 J E E S Sharp and A E Stamp, <i>Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mortem </i> (London: n.p., n.d.), 4: 238-249.

2 J E E S Sharp and A E Stamp, <i>Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mortem </i> (London: n.p., n.d.), 6: 157-171.

3 Edward Hasted, <i>The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent</i>, 12 (Canterbury: W Bristow, 1799), 5: 311-322.

4 Edward Hasted, <i>The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent</i>, 12 (Canterbury: W Bristow, 1799), 5: 324-336.

5 Edward Hasted, <i>The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent</i>, 12 (Canterbury: W Bristow, 1799), 2: 141-162.

6 Edward Hasted, <i>The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent</i>, 12 (Canterbury: W Bristow, 1799), 4: 416-447.

7 Edward Hasted, <i>The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent</i>, 12 (Canterbury: W Bristow, 1799), 8: 282-303.

8 Edward Hasted, <i>The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent</i>, 12 (Canterbury: W Bristow, 1799), 8: 142-147.

9 Edward Hasted, <i>The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent</i>, 12 (Canterbury: W Bristow, 1799), 7: 238-244.

10 Edward Hasted, <i>The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent</i>, 12 (Canterbury: W Bristow, 1799), 6: 68-80.

11 Edward Hasted, <i>The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent</i>, 12 (Canterbury: W Bristow, 1799), 9: 319-328.

12 Edward Hasted, <i>The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent</i>, 12 (Canterbury: W Bristow, 1799), 5: 280-294.

13 Edward Hasted, <i>The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent</i>, 12 (Canterbury: W Bristow, 1799), 8: 118-119.

14 Edward Hasted, <i>The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent</i>, 12 (Canterbury: W Bristow, 1799), 8: 63-78.

15 Edward Hasted, <i>The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent</i>, 12 (Canterbury: W Bristow, 1799), 6: 532-549.

16 Edward Hasted, <i>The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent</i>, 12 (Canterbury: W Bristow, 1799), 7: 384-398.

17 Edward Hasted, <i>The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent</i>, 12 (Canterbury: W Bristow, 1799), 5: 415-445.

18 J E E S Sharp and A E Stamp, <i>Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mortem </i> (London: n.p., n.d.), 6: 242-252.

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