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John Goring
(-Abt 1495)
Margaret Radmylde
Humphrey Hewster of London
Joan
John Goring of Burton, Sussex
(-After 1499)
Joan Hewster
John Goring of Burton, Sussex
(-1520)

 

Family Links

Spouses/Children:
1. Constance Dyke

John Goring of Burton, Sussex

  • Marriage (1): Constance Dyke 1
  • Died: 16 Oct 1520 1
  • Buried: St. Richard's Church, Burton Park, Duncton, Petworth, West Sussex, GU28 0QU, GB 2

  Noted events in his life were:

Manorial Estate, 1499, Iping Manor, Midhurst, West Sussex, GU29, GB. 3 IPING, which was held of the Confessor by Oualet, was not included in the lands given to Earl Roger, but in 1086 was held directly of King William by Eldred (of Winchester). It was rated at 4 hides; there was a mill, a quarry worth 9s. 4d., and extensive woodland; one haw in Chichester belonged to the manor, and 40d. was received from circet, or church-scot. Towards the end of the 12th century the manor was in the hands of Richard Musard, who gave to Lewes Priory 'the hide of Trepeham with croft and meadow' in Iping. In 1212 this gift was confirmed by Richard's son and heir William Musard, who subsequently added 'the land which is called Hooe' in a charter to which his wife Joan and his heir William gave their consent. The manor evidently descended in the family, as in 1330 William Musard died seised of the manor of Iping, then said to be held of Herbert de St. Quintin, whose connexion with it is otherwise unknown; William's son and namesake was 'of Iping' in 1339, in which year Sir Henry Husee of Hastings acknowledged a debt to him of 100 marks. It seems probable that this was for the purchase of the manor, which is next found, in 1370, in the hands of Sir Henry Husee, and in 1390 in those of Ankarette his widow at the time of her death. In 1412 Henry Husee held 2/3 of the manor, the other being dower of his mother Margaret, and he and the Prior of Lewes held jointly knight's fee in Iping in 1428. Henry Lovell, who had married Constance, one of the two daughters and coheirs of Nicholas Husee (d. 1472), in 1499 quitclaimed all right in the manor and advowson to John Goring, whose father John (d. 1495) had probably purchased them some years before, as he was patron of the church in 1483. John's great-grandson George Goring sold in 1576 to John Selwyn of Friston.

Manorial Estate, 1499-1520, Lancing Manor, Lancing, West Sussex, BN15, GB. 4 In 1400 Richard Radmyld died seised of Lancing, his brother and heir Ralph being named as lord in 1412. From 1426 Lancing descended with the Radmyld moiety of Broadwater (after 1457 the whole manor). After the death of William Radmyld in 1499, however, it diverged from that descent, passing after complicated transactions to Radmyld's cousin and co-heir John Goring of Burton, whose family had held lands in Lancing since the late 14th century. After John's death in 1520 the manor passed from father to son through Sir William (d. 1553/4), Sir Henry (d. 1594), Sir William (d. 1601-2), Sir Henry (d. 1626), Sir William (d. 1658), Sir Henry (d. 1671), and Sir William (d. 1724).

Manorial Estate, 1514, North Marden Manor, Chichester, West Sussex, PO19, GB. 5 Of the several Domesday holdings of Marden, one of 5 hides was held by Robert (son of Tetbald) of Earl Roger, and held of him by a certain Corbelin, who also held 5 hides in Barlavington. There was also a small holding of hide belonging to this Marden, held by Fulk. In the time of King Edward the 5-hide holding had been held as two manors in alodial tenure by Alwin and Alvric, while the second was held by Alvric as an alod.

The manor continued under the overlordship of the Earls of Arundel.

North Marden may have formed part of the 5 fees held by Hugh de Falaise in the time of Henry I, as fee here was held by Hugh's granddaughter Agnes widow of Geoffrey son of Azo, and after her death it was successfully claimed by her nieces Margaret, Denise, and Florence, daughters of Richard Murdac, against William Aguillon, who represented Hugh de Falaise through his other daughter. William called to warrant Alfred de Lincoln, who was perhaps his guardian or trustee. Margaret married Nicholas de Lymesy and in 1235 William Aguillon claimed the fee against her and her son Walter, to whom he eventually, in 1241, made over his rights.Walter was succeeded by Nicholas de Lymesy, probably his son, who in 1246 made an agreement with William Dawtrey that they should present alternately to the church of North Marden. Presumably the fee had passed into the hands of William Dawtrey, as his granddaughter Eve inherited 2 fees in Barlavington, Marden, and elsewhere. She married three times: first Roger de Shelvestrode, who held the fees in 1302, then William Paynel, the tenant in 1314, and finally Edward St. John. The manor of Barlavington and lands in North Marden were among the estates settled on Edward and Eve and her heirs in 1318, and at her death in 1354 they passed to her son John St. John. The subsequent history of this mesne lordship is obscure. In 1428 a fee in North Marden was said to be held by the Prior of Maiden Bradley and William St. John and to have formerly been held by Roger de Lynche, but Roger's connexion with the fee is otherwise unrecorded. William St. John left a daughter Elizabeth, who married Henry Dyke, and their coheirs were their granddaughters, Constance wife of John Goring and Eleanor wife of William Dering. The advowson (q.v.) descended to them, but no more is recorded of the lordship.

Manorial Estate, 1514, Litchfield Manor, Whitchurch, Hampshire, RG28, GB. 6 On the death of Isabel, Litchfield passed to William and Eva [de Echingham], and was sold by them in 1315 to Edward de St. John of Barlavington (co. Suss.). Edward obtained a grant of free warren in his demesne lands of Litchfield in 1334 and died about 1340, leaving a widow Eva, who in 1346 was stated to be holding half a fee in Litchfield which had belonged to Isabel de Stopham. Eva died in 1354, leaving by Edward an only daughter Elizabeth, who became the wife of Henry Dyke of Sussex, from whom the manor ultimately descended to two sisters and co-heirs, Eleanor the wife of William Dering of Surrenden (co. Kent) and Constance the wife of John Goring of Burton (co. Suss.). In 1514 the manor was settled on John Goring and Constance for life with remainder to their son William in tail-male, but this settlement seems later to have been set on one side, for in 1537 John Kingsmill, who married Constance daughter of John Goring (if the pedigrees are correct), but in all probability his widow, obtained a quitclaim of the manor from Nicholas Dering, son and heir of William Dering and Eleanor, in return for an annuity of 6 12s. 8d. In 1540 John obtained a grant of the rent of 13s. 4d. issuing from the manor formerly belonging to Hyde Abbey, and died seised of the manor in 1556, leaving a son and heir William. From this date the manor has followed the same descent as Sydmonton (q.v.), the present owner being Mr. Andrew de Portal Kingsmill.

Will, 16 Oct 1520. 2 John Goringe, 16th October, 12 Henry VIII, 1520. My body to be buried in the Church of Bukedon, nigh my father, and I will my executors make a tomb upon my burial, with this writing:

[text omitted]

Also I will that a priest be found to pray for my soul in the Church of Bukedon for the space of seven years; I will that William Goringe, my son, have all my books at Gray's Inn, in London; I will that my evidences be safely kept in the Priory of Heringham, until William Goringe be of the full age of twenty-four years; to each of my four daughters unmarried, that is Sybil, Eleanor, Jane and Ann cl [100]; to my sister Shirley a ring of gold value iv nobles; John Goringe my grandfather. And I constitute John Dautrey the elder, and the Prior of Heryngham, my executors, and my brother Robert Shirley, Cofferor to the King, surveyor.

Probate, 7 Feb 1521. 2


John married Constance Dyke, daughter of Henry Dyke and Elizabeth St. John.1 (Constance Dyke was born about 1449-1459.)


Sources


1 William Berry, <i>Pedigrees of the Families in the County of Sussex</i>, 1 (London: Sherwood, Gilbert and Piper, 1830), 138-139.

2 Nicholas Harris Nichols Esq., <i>Testementa Vetusta - an Illustration From Wills of Customs... </i> (London, GB: Nichols and Sons, 1826), 2: 561.

3 <i>A History of the County of Sussex</i>, 8 (London: Victoria County History, 1953), 4: 63-65.

4 <i>A History of the County of Sussex</i>, 8 (London: Victoria County History, 1953), 6 Part 1: 34-53.

5 <i>A History of the County of Sussex</i>, 8 (London: Victoria County History, 1953), 4: 108-110.

6 William Page, editor, <i>A History of the County of Hampshire</i>, 4 (London: Victoria County History, 1911), 4: 267-270.

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