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William [II] de Braose of Bramber and Abergavenny
(Bef 1096-After 1175)
Bertha of Hereford
Bernard [III] de Saint-Valéry
(-Abt 1191)
Anora
(-After 1194)
William [III] de Braose
(-1211)
Mathilde de Saint-Valéry
(1155-1210)
William [IV] de Braose of Bramber
(-1210)

 

Family Links

Spouses/Children:
1. Matilda de Clare

William [IV] de Braose of Bramber 3 4

  • Marriage (1): Matilda de Clare before 1196 1 2
  • Died: 1210, Corfe Castle, The Square, Corfe Castle, Swanage, Dorset, BH20 5EZ, GB 4 5 6

   Cause of his death was Starved to death.

   Other names for William were William "Gam" de Braiose, William IV "The Younger" de Braose and William de Brewes.

  General Notes:

WILLIAM [IV] de Briouse (-Corfe 1210). "Willelmus de Braosa dominus de Brechen" donated property to Flaxley Abbey, Gloucestershire, for the souls of "uxoris meĉ Matildis de Sancto Walerico et puerorum nostrorum", by undated charter, witnessed by "Willelmo et Philippo filiis meis". Matthew Paris records that "uxorem Willelmi de Brause et Willelmum filium eius cum uxore sua" were captured in 1210 at the siege of Meath, but escaped, were captured again "in insula de May", and imprisoned at Windsor, in a later passage recording that all four died "apud Windleshores". The Annals of Waverley record that "Matildis matrona nobilis cognomento de la Haie, uxor Willelmi de Braose" was captured with "Willelmo filio suo milite…in Galwaitha" in 1210 and starved to death "apud Windeshores". A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records that "Mathildis uxor eius et Willielmus filius eorum" (referring to William, son of "Willelmo Brewes" and his wife "Berta…comitis Milonis secunda filia") were imprisoned by King John and died in prison. The Annals of Dunstable record that "Willelmum de Brause juniorem et sororem eius et Matildam matrem eius" were captured in Ireland in 1210 by King John, adding that they later died in prison. The 13th century Histoire des ducs de Normandie et des rois d´Angleterre records that "Mehaus sa feme [Guillaumes de Braiouse] et Guillaumes ses fils" fled from King John to Ireland where they were captured at "le castiel de Cracfergu", taken to England, and imprisoned at "el castiel del Corf" where they were starved to death.

m MATILDA, daughter of ---. Matthew Paris records that "uxorem Willelmi de Brause et Willelmum filium eius cum uxore sua" were captured in 1210 at the siege of Meath, but escaped, were captured again "in insula de May", and imprisoned at Windsor, in a later passage recording that all four died "apud Windleshores". This report appears to be inaccurate concerning the death of the younger William´s wife, in light of the sources quoted below in which she is named later. [Henry III King of England granted letters of conduct to "Matillis de Breusa" dated 13 Aug 1217, but the extract neither states the purpose or destination of the journey nor gives any further information to identify Matilda more precisely.] "Matilda de Clere who was the wife of Wm de Breus" demanded "a third part of the manors of Sheiham, Braeck, Beding [and others]" from "Reginald de Breus" in 1219. Elwes quotes this claim as part of the same action under which "John de Breus" demanded "the castle of Brembre" from "Reginald de Breus". This latter claim is summarised by Bracton, who does not include any reference to a claim by Matilda. Two possible parentages of Matilda, wife of William [IV], have been proposed. The first possibility, according to Elwes, is that William´s wife was "the daughter of Ralph and sister and coheir of John de Fay", adding that "after her first husband Wm de Braose´s death in 1210, [she] married Roger de Clere". He cites no primary source on which he bases this information. Drake, in a short Braose pedigree, expands the information slightly when he records the wife of William [IV] as "Matilda dau. of Ralph de Fay, sister and heiress of John de Fay of Bromley, co. Surrey, d. 1249" but also cites no primary source. The connection between the Fay and Clere families can be established by two claims recorded by Bracton. Under the first, dated 1231, "Hugo de Neouilla et Beatricia uxor eius" claimed against "Rogerum de Clere et Matillidem uxorem eius" revenue from "Childerst" which Beatrix held "per Radulfum de Fay primum virum suum", the defendants stating "ad warantum Johannem de Fay filium et heredum predicti Radulfi de Fay qui presens est" that they had "ingressum in terram...per predictum Radulfum patrem suum". The second, dated 1232, is a claim by "Hugo de Neouilla et Beatricia uxor eius" against "Johannem de Fay filium et heredem Radulfi de Fay" relating to land "in Brumlegha in com. Surreie" in which "Rogerus de Clere et Matillis uxor eius" had "ingressum...per Radulfum de Fay quondam virum ipsius Beatricie". Bracton´s summaries do not state any relationship between Ralph de Fay and Matilda nor, more importantly, do they establish any connection with the Briouse family. The second possibility is that William [IV] married, as her first husband, Matilda de Clare, daughter of Richard de Clare Earl of Hertford & his wife Amicie of Gloucester ([1185/90]-). This marriage is stated in many secondary sources, but the primary source which confirms this parentage and marriage of William´s wife has not yet been identified. Her birth date range is estimated from her having had at least one child by her [presumed] first marriage and at least three by her second. If her parentage is correct, she was presumably the earl of Hertford´s daughter who married secondly (1219) Rhys ap Rhys "Gryg/the Hoarse". The Chronicle of the Princes of Wales records that "Rhys the Hoarse married the daughter of the earl of Clare" in 1219. This second possibility appears more plausible, given the generally high-profile marriages contracted by the Briouse family at the time. In addition, a writ dated 27 Dec "46 Hen III", after the death of "Richard Lungespeye" refers to the manor of "Brumleghe" in Surrey being held by "John de Fay...after whose death it was parted between his two sisters Maud and Philippa, and from the said Maud issued a daughter Agatha...". The absence in this passage of any mention of the Briouse family, who would have been the senior heirs of "Maud" if she had married William [IV] de Briouse, suggests that she could not have been his wife.

William [IV] & his wife had [five] children:

[FMG/Medieval Lands]

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William de Braose, born perhaps c1175, died Corfe or Windsor Castle 1210, of starvation by order of King John, son of William de Braose, died 1211, Lord of Bramber, Sussex, by his wife Maud de St Valery.

[Magna Charta Sureties]

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William did not accompany King Richard on Crusade but fought with King John against Philip in Normandy (1203/4). King John demanded William as a hostage for his father's loyalty in 1208. His mother Maud refused and the fled to Ireland. In 1210 John prepared an expedition to Ireland. Maud and William escaped Ireland, but were apprehended in Scotland. William the father was in Wales at the time. It is believed that Maud and William were starved to death at Windsor Castle (Some say Corfe).

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William, who perished by starvation with his mother at Windsor m. Maud, dau. of the Earl of Clare, with whom he had the town of Buckingham, in frank marriage, and left a son, John

[Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, England, 1883, p. 72, Braose, Baron Braose, of Gower]


William married Matilda de Clare, daughter of Richard de Clare 3rd Earl of Hertford, MCS and Amice FitzRobert 3rd Countess of Gloucester, before 1196.1 2 (Matilda de Clare was born about 1185-1190 1.)


Sources


1 Charles Cawley, <i>Medieval Lands</i>.

2 Frederick Lewis Weis, Walter Lee Sheppard, William Ryland Beall, <i>Magna Carta Sureties 1215: the Barons Named in the Magna Carta, 1215 and Some of their Descendants who Settled in America during the Early Colonial Years</i> (Genealogical Publishing Company, 1999), 28a-2.

3 Carol Middleton, "Carol Middleton's Genealogy".

4 Frederick Lewis Weis, Walter Lee Sheppard, William Ryland Beall, <i>Magna Carta Sureties 1215: the Barons Named in the Magna Carta, 1215 and Some of their Descendants who Settled in America during the Early Colonial Years</i> (Genealogical Publishing Company, 1999), 28A-2.

5 Frederick Lewis Weis, Jr. Walter Lee Sheppard, William Ryland Beall, Kaleen E. Beall, <i>Ancestral Roots Of Certain American Colonists Who Came To America Before 1700: Lineages from Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Other Historical Individuals</i> (Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004 (Reprint)), 63A:28.

6 Carol Middleton, "Carol Middleton's Genealogy", says Windsor.

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