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Sir Robert Latimer of Duntish, Dorset
(1361-)
Margaret Pecche
Sir John Pipard
Sir John Latimer of East Pulham, Dorset
(-1460)
Catherine Pipard
Sir Nicholas Latimer of Duntish, Dorset
(Abt 1429-Between 1505/1505)

 

Family Links

Spouses/Children:
1. Joan Hody

2. Margaret
  • Elizabeth Latimer

Sir Nicholas Latimer of Duntish, Dorset 2 3 4 5 6 7

  • Born: Abt 1429 3
  • Marriage (1): Joan Hody before 17 Dec 1441 1 2 3
  • Marriage (2): Margaret 3
  • Died: Between 8 Feb and 17 Apr 1505 3 6

  General Notes:

LATIMER, Sir Nicholas (1429-1505); of Duntish in Buckland. Customer of Poole and Controller of subsidy in London, 1455-60. M.P. Dorset 1453-4,7 (? 1470-1), 1472-5. Lancastrian.

S. and h. of Sir John Latimer of the same, M.P. 1437 (d. 1460), by his wife Catherine Pipard;8 m. (1) Jane da. of Sir John Hody M.P. Chief Justice (d. 1441), by whom he had Sir John Latimer M.P. (1450-1500); and (2) Margaret who survived him.8

An elector, Dorset, 1450 and 1460. In Mar. 1455 he was made contr. of subsidy and poundage in the port of London, and in June 1455 contr. of customs etc. in Poole; which latter office was renewed in 1458. He was pardoned, 4 Jan. I459, as "Lte of Duntysshe, Dorset, esq., alias late sheriff of Somerset and Dorset" (m.36); sheriff, Som. and Dorset, 1453-4; sheriff Glos., 1458-9; a Dorset comnr., Apr. 1459.

In 1461 he was attainted, and in Feb. and Mar. 1462 his lands were granted away to Sir John Howard and Edward Grey;9 in fact he was with Queen Margaret in the North. Worcester (Annales, p. 780) says that Sir Nicholas Latimer was restored to his lands in Dec. 1462; but the pardon to Sir Nicholas Latimer is dated 30 June 1463; and the attainder was not reversed till 1467/8. In Aug. 1466 Nicholas Latimer knt. and his heir were restored to the lands he had forfeited in 1461. The casual way in which he is not called knight in 1462 except by Worcester, and the official adoption of the title in 1463 and later, suggests that he was kntd. by the Lancastrians after Edward's coronation. He cannot have been kntd. by Edward while under attaint. He was exempted from the Act of Resumption of 1467/8 and restored by that Parlt. 3 June 1468, "he having sworn loyalty to the King at Bamborough before the Earls of Warwick and Worcester"1 \emdash this must have been in 1463. In Apr. 1470 Latimer was one of those followers of Clarence and Warwick whose lands were to be seized as rebels.

The Readeption govt, made him a comnr. in Oct. 1470 and sheriff of Som. and Dorset again Nov. 1470, and he seems to have followed Clarence, remained sheriff after Tewkesbury, and was elected to Parlt. and pardoned, 3 Feb. 1472, "of Dunthysshe, knt." ; and made J.P. 8 Dec. 1471 to 15 July 1474, 15 Apr. 1478 to 5 Dec. 1483, 15 Nov. 1485 till death. He was on the subsidy comns. in Apr. and Aug. 1483, but joined with the Duke of Buckingham, raising the men of Berkshire; attainted, "late of Duntish"2 in 1484; but pardoned his life 26 Apr. 1484, though his lands were granted elsewhere in Dec. He may well have fled overseas and returned with Henry of Richmond. His attainder was reversed 1485 and he was reinstated on the bench.

D. 1505; will, dat. 8 Feb., pr. 17 Apr. 1505. To be buried in St. Margaret's, Buckland. Margaret his wife sole exix.3

Footnotes:
7 Called "Knight" in the Return, but erroneously.
8 Ex inf. E. S. Fry ; Som. Rec. Soc. xix. 337.
9 Cal. Pat. Rolls (1462), pp. in, 178.
1 Cal. Pat. Rolls (1468), 90.
2 Rot. Pari. vi. 246.
3 P.C.C., 29 Holgrave.

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SIR Nicholas Latimer we find to have been High Sheriff of the County of Dorset once, in the thirty second of Henry the Sixth, and again in the eleventh year of King Edward the Fourth; and in those turbulent and difficult times this Office might have been indeed properly called Onus cum honore: for the men so imployed, were at that time sought out among the richest, the most popular and the most powerful, that the Country would not only obey at home but follow abroad; and men then depending upon the Bounty and Hospitality of the Great, their Inclinations and Example were of more force than all the Cases of Law and Conscience: The Prudence (notwithstand|ing) and good Fortune of Sir Nicholas Latimer did happily conduct him through the vio|lent Reigns of three very active Princes, King Henry, King Edward, and King Richard the Third, and brought him peacefully to rest with his Fathers, in the Twentieth year of King Henry the Seventh, at a very great Age, although with that Circumstance, of leaving no Heir Male to Inherit his Lands and Family; and for only Issue of the Lady Joan his Wife, the Daughter of Sir John Hoddy,

Edith Latimer Lady Mordaunt. 1 3

  Research Notes:

There is no church in Buckland dedicated to St. Margaret. Need to check will to correct church name or location.

  Events

Manorial Estate: East Stoke (or Stokett) Manor, Stoke-sub-Hamdon, Somerset, TA14, GB. 8 The manor of EAST STOKE or STOKETT was held by Alwin T.R.E. In 1086 Mauger de Cartrai held it of the count of Mortain. By c. 1284 Ralph de Huppehull or Opehulle held it of Maud de Multon, lady of Ashill, and she of the countess of Aumale. Mauger was also Domesday tenant of Ashill, and it is therefore probable that his holding at East Stoke may have descended like Ashill.
[...]

Ralph de Huppedhull's estate at Stokett c. 1284 was fee. By 1297 Ralph de Hull, possibly the same man, had apparently leased his lands there which became the subject of a legal dispute. The property seems to have descended like the manor of Child Okeford (Dors.), to the Latimer family. Robert de Hull held that manor in 1317. His daughter and heir Catherine married as her first husband Sir Andrew Turberville, who was in possession of Stokett by 1350. As her second husband Catherine married Sir Robert Latimer of Duntish (Dors.). When she died in 1361, shortly after her second husband, she was succeeded by her son William Turberville. By 1381, however, William had died without male issue, and Robert Latimer, his halfbrother, succeeding John Rocheford, had taken possession of the property.

The estate then descended through the Latimer family. Sir John, son of Catherine's son Robert, died in 1460, and was succeeded by his son Sir Nicholas (d. 1505). Nicholas's daughter and heir Edith married Sir John Mordaunt (d. 1504), of Turvey (Beds.), speaker of the House of Commons, and Stokett and other lands were settled on them. By 1560 it was held by John, eldest son of John, Lord Mordaunt (d. 1562), though the capital messuage was in the hands of John Buckland of West Harptree. John's heir Lewis, Lord Mordaunt (1538-1601), sold the property to Thomas Freke in 1597. In 1627 John Seward died holding the manor, described as a capital messuage, a farm called the farm of East Stokett, and named lands. He was succeeded by his infant son, also John. John Seward and Elizabeth his wife made over the manor in 1649 to two feoffees. From that time no trace has been found of the manor; the estate centred upon East Stoke House, created in the late 18th century by the Chaffey family, never claimed manorial status, but was built up piecemeal from scattered holdings in the area of the original manor.

Will, 8 Feb 1505. 3

Probate, 17 Apr 1505. 3


Nicholas married Joan Hody, daughter of Sir John Hody and Elizabeth Jewe, before 17 Dec 1441.1 2 3 (Joan Hody was born about 1430 and died before 8 Feb 1504.)


Nicholas next married Margaret.3


Sources


1 Robert Halstead, <i>Succint genealogies of the noble and ancient houses of Alno or de Alneto, Broc of Stephale, Latimer of Duntish, Drayton of Drayton, Mauduit of Westminster, Green of Drayton, Vere of Addington, Fitz-Lewes of Westhornedon, Howard of Effingham and Mordaunt of Turvey justified by publick records, ancient and extant charters, histories and other authentick proofs, and enriched with divers sculptures of tombs, images, seals, and other curiosities </i> (London, GB: W. Burrell, 1685), 44.

2 John Burke, <i>A Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Commoners of Great Britian and Ireland, Enjoying Territorial Possessions or High Official Rank: but Uninvested with Heritable Honours, Volume 1</i> (Henry Colburn, 1835), Vol 1. p 681.

3 Josiah C. Wedgewood and Anne D. Holt, <i>The History of Parliament: 1439-1509</i>, 3 (London, GB: His Majesty's Staionery Office, 1936), 1: 528-529.

4 George Edward Cokayne, "Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom" (Sutton Publishing Ltd., 2000), IX, p. 193.

5 Robert Halstead, <i>Succint genealogies of the noble and ancient houses of Alno or de Alneto, Broc of Stephale, Latimer of Duntish, Drayton of Drayton, Mauduit of Westminster, Green of Drayton, Vere of Addington, Fitz-Lewes of Westhornedon, Howard of Effingham and Mordaunt of Turvey justified by publick records, ancient and extant charters, histories and other authentick proofs, and enriched with divers sculptures of tombs, images, seals, and other curiosities </i> (London, GB: W. Burrell, 1685), 44, 398-9.

6 Sir Bernard Burke, <i>A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited & Extinct Peerages of the British Empire</i> (59 Pall Mall, London, GB, Harrison, 1866), p. 315.

7 Josiah C. Wedgewood and Anne D. Holt, <i>The History of Parliament: 1439-1509</i>, 3 (London, GB: His Majesty's Staionery Office, 1936), 1: 607-608.

8 <i>A History of the County of Somerset</i>, 10 (London: Victoria County History, 1974), 3: 235-249.

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