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Donnchad mac Crínáin Dunkeld King Duncan I of Scotland
(Abt 1001-1040)
Edward of England
(Abt 1016/1017-1057)
Agatha
(Between 1025/1035-After 1068)
Máel Coluim mac Donnchada Dunkeld King Malcolm III of Scotland
(1031-1093)
Margaret of England
(Between 1046/1053-1093)
Dabíd mac Maíl Choluim Dunkeld King David I of Scotland, 3rd Earl of Huntingdon
(Abt 1084-1153)

 

Family Links

Spouses/Children:
1. Matilda of Huntingdon

Dabíd mac Maíl Choluim Dunkeld King David I of Scotland, 3rd Earl of Huntingdon 3 4 5 6 7

  • Born: Abt 1084 7 8
  • Marriage (1): Matilda of Huntingdon in 1113 1 2
  • Died: 24 May 1153, Carlisle, Cumbria, CA1, GB aged about 69 7 8
  • BuriedMale: Dunfermline Abbey, Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland, KY11, GB

   Other names for Dabíd were Dabíd mac Maíl Choluim [Medieval Gaelic] Dunkeld, Daibhidh I mac [Mhaoil] Chaluim [Modern Gaelic] Dunkeld and David "The Saint" Dunkeld.

  General Notes:

DAVID, son of MALCOLM III "Caennmor/Bighead" King of Scotland & his wife Margaret of England ([1080]-Carlisle 24 May 1153, bur Dunfermline Abbey, Fife). He is named, and his parentage given, by Roger of Hoveden, who lists him as the sixth son of his parents. The Chronicle of John of Fordun names "Edward, Edmund, Ethelred, Edgar, Alexander and…David" as the sons of King Malcolm and his wife. He was designated Prince of Cumbria in [1107]. "David comes" made donations to the monks of Durham by undated charter which names "frater meus Eadgarus rex", witnessed by "Mathildis Reginæ et Willelmi filii sui", presumably referring to his sister Matilda Queen of England which dates the document to before Jun 1118. Earl of Northampton and Huntingdon, de iure uxoris. "David comes filius Malcolmi Regis Scottorum" founded the abbey of Selkirk by charter dated to [1120], witnessed by "Matilde comitisse, Henrico filio comitis…". "David comes filii Malcolmi regis Scotorum" founded the monastery of Kelso by charter dated to [1119/24] witnessed by "Matilda comitissa, Henrico filio comitis…Willo nepote comitis…". Inquisitions by "David…Cumbrensis regionis princeps", dated 1124, concern land owned by the church of Glasgow. He succeeded his brother in 1124 as DAVID I King of Scotland. Having at first supported Empress Matilda's right to succeed her father Henry I King of England, he made peace with King Stephen, agreeing in 1136 to resign his English earldoms to his son Henry. The peace was short-lived, King David being defeated by King Stephen at the battle of the Standard 22 Aug 1138. "Rex Scottorum" (no name) donated "terram de Eldune…Dernewic" to Melrose abbey, for the souls of "fratris mei Ædgari et alios fratrem et sororis mearum et uxoris mee Matild et…Henrici filii mei", by charter dated "die Venis crastino Ascensionis dni…quo Stephanus rex Anglie captus est" (29 Apr 1141). Robert of Torigny records the death in 1153 of "David rex Scotiæ". The Chronicle of the Picts and Scots dated 1251 records that "David" reigned for 29 years and 3 months, died "in Carlelle", and was buried "in Dumfermline". The Chronicle of Melrose records the death "IX Kal Jun" in 1153 of King David. John of Fordun´s Scotichronicon (Continuator) records the death "IX Kal Jun" in 1153 of "rex…sanctus David junior filius Malcolmi et S. Margaretæ Scotorum reginæ" and his burial at Dunfermline.

m (1113) as her second husband, MATILDA [Maud] of Huntingdon, widow of SIMON de St Lis Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton, daughter of WALTHEOF Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton & his wife Judith de Lens [Boulogne] ([1071/76]-[23 Apr 1130/22 Apr 1131], bur Scone Abbey, Perthshire). Ingulph's Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland records the marriage of Matilda eldest daughter of Judith and "Earl Simon. Guillaume de Jumièges records that the eldest of the three daughters of Waltheof & his wife married "Simon de Senlis" and later "David frère de la seconde Mathilde reine des Anglais". Her parents are named by Orderic Vitalis. Robert of Torigny records that the wife of "David [rex Scotiæ] frater [Alexandri]" was "filiam Gallevi comitis et Judith consobrini regis", naming "Symon Silvanectensis comes" as her first husband. "Matilde comitisse, Henrico filio comitis…" witnessed the charter dated to [1120] under which "David comes filius Malcolmi Regis Scottorum" founded the abbey of Selkirk. "David comes filii Malcolmi regis Scotorum" founded the monastery of Kelso by charter dated to [1119/24] witnessed by "Matilda comitissa, Henrico filio comitis…Willo nepote comitis…". "Matildis comitissa…" witnessed inquisitions by "David…Cumbrensis regionis princeps", dated 1124, concerning land owned by the church of Glasgow.

King David & his wife had [five] children:

[FMG/Medieval Lands]

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David I (b. c. 1082--d. May 24, 1153, Carlisle, Cumberland, Eng.), one of the most powerful Scottish kings (reigned from 1124). He admitted into Scotland an Anglo-French (Norman) aristocracy that played a major part in the later history of the kingdom. He also reorganized Scottish Christianity to conform with continental European and English usages and founded many religious communities, mostly for Cistercian monks and Augustinian canons.

The youngest of the six sons of the Scottish king Malcolm III Canmore and Queen Margaret (afterward St. Margaret), David spent much of his early life at the court of his brother-in-law King Henry I of England. Through David's marriage (1113) to a daughter of Waltheof, earl of Northumbria, he acquired the English earldom of Huntingdon and obtained much land in that county and in Northamptonshire. With Anglo-Norman help, David secured from his brother Alexander I, king of Scots from 1107, the right to rule Cumbria, Strathclyde, and part of Lothian. In April 1124, on the death of Alexander, David became king of Scots.

David recognized his niece, the Holy Roman empress Matilda (died 1167), as heir to Henry I in England, and from 1136 he fought for her against King Stephen (crowned as Henry's successor in December 1135), hoping thereby to gain Northumberland for himself. A brief peace made with Stephen in 1136 resulted in the cession of Cumberland to David and the transfer of Huntingdon to his son Earl Henry. David, however, continued to switch sides. While fighting for Matilda again, he was defeated in the Battle of the Standard, near Northallerton, Yorkshire (Aug. 22, 1138). He then made peace once more with Stephen, who in 1139 granted Northumberland (as an English fief) to Earl Henry. In 1141 David reentered the war on Matilda's behalf, and in 1149 he knighted her son Henry Plantagenet (afterward King Henry II of England), who acknowledged David's right to Northumberland.

In Scotland, David created a rudimentary central administration, issued the first Scottish royal coinage, and built or rebuilt the castles around which grew the first Scottish burghs: Edinburgh, Stirling, Berwick, Roxburgh, and perhaps Perth. As ruler of Cumbria he had taken Anglo-Normans into his service, and during his kingship many others settled in Scotland, founding important families and intermarrying with the older Scottish aristocracy. Bruce, Stewart, Comyn, and Oliphant are among the noted names whose bearers went from northern France to England during the Norman Conquest in 1066 and then to Scotland in the reign of David I. To these and other French-speaking immigrants, David granted land in return for specified military service or contributions of money, as had been done in England from the time of the Conquest.

[Encyclopaedia Britannica CD '97]

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Upon the death of Simon de St. Liz, Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton, David, son of Malcolm III, King of Scotland, had m. the deceased earl's widow, the Countess Maud, under the especial sanction of King Henry I. This nobleman succeeded to the Scottish throne on the decease of Alexander, his elder brother, in 1124, and, invading England, was met upon the border by King Stephen, when their differences were amicable adjusted.

[Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, 1883, p. 468, St. Liz, Earls of Huntingdon]

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on the history of the Earldom of Huntingdon:

After Earl Simon's [Matilda's 1st husband] death, his Widow married David I of Scotland, who consequently became Earl of Huntingdon too, keeping the Earldom even after he succeeded his brother as King of Scots. He sided with the Empress Maud against Stephen I but came to terms with the latter and made the Earldom over to his son Henry.

[Burke's Peerage]

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Earl of Huntingdon. United Alba with Strathclyde. Earl of Northampton. Popularly reputed as a Saint, his feast day is 24th May.

[Brian Tompsett, Directory of Royal Genealogical Data - http://www.dcs.hull.oc.uk/public/royal]

  Events

• Title: Prince of the Cumbrians, 1113 To 1124.

• Title: King of Scotland, 1124 To 1153.

• Title: 3rd Earl of Huntingdon.


Dabíd married Matilda of Huntingdon, daughter of Waltheof Siwardson 1st Earl of Huntingdon, Earl of Northumbria and Judith de Lens, in 1113.1 2 (Matilda of Huntingdon was born between 1071 and 1074,2 9 died 23 Apr 1130 or 22 Apr 1131 2 and was buried in Scone Abbey, Scone, Perth, Perth and Kinross, PH2, GB.)


Sources


1 Charles Cawley, <i>Medieval Lands</i>.

2 Frederick Lewis Weis, Walter Lee Sheppard, David Faris, <i>Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants</i> (Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1992), 148-24.

3 Frederick Lewis Weis, Walter Lee Sheppard, William Ryland Beall, <i>Magna Carta Sureties 1215: the Barons Named in the Magna Carta, 1215 and Some of their Descendants who Settled in America during the Early Colonial Years</i> (Genealogical Publishing Company, 1999), 139-1.

4 Charles Mosley, <i>Burke's Peerage & Baronetage</i> (Burke's Peerage, 1999), 1474.

5 Frederick Lewis Weis, Walter Lee Sheppard, David Faris, <i>Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants</i> (Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1992), 89-25.

6 George Edward Cokayne, "Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom" (Sutton Publishing Ltd., 2000), III:167-169.

7 William Henry Turton, <i>The Plantagenet Ancestry</i> (1968), 21.

8 Frederick Lewis Weis, Walter Lee Sheppard, David Faris, <i>Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants</i> (Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1992), 170-22.

9 George Edward Cokayne, "Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom" (Sutton Publishing Ltd., 2000), VI:641.

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